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The Life And Death Of Cholmondeley Essays

The Life and Death of Cholmondeley

In this essay, "The Life and Death of Cholmondeley" Gerald M. Durrel effectively illustrates that the needs of Chumley, the intelligent ape are better met by him rather then the authorities of the London Zoo. Firstly, Chumley shows many qualities of a curios infant, he demonstrates a considerable potential to learn and analyze simple skills ideas and situations. Like a small child, it is evident that Chumley needs certain intimate attention not properly provided by the zoo. When Durrel limits the amount of attention given to Chumley, the ape becomes "a little jealous of [the new monkey] Sue- but he was too much of a gentle man to show it." (Pg. 25)

Evidently, Chumley longs for attention, and things got out of control when he left to go out in the public and interact the best he knows how. Secondly, the animals physical heath and safely is a main concern when deciding weather the Zoo or Durrel should gain possession of the beast.

It is unsafe for the Chumley to stay in the Zoo with obviously easy access to an exit, or escape root, on a street where he can be hit by cars or/and possibly be killed, like when "there were some cars parked there and Chumley approached them and beat on the doors...but the foolish humans misconstructed his actions: there he was full of Christmas Spirit, asking for a lift, and all they would do is wind up there windows and yell for help." (Pg. 26) This situation demonstrates the Chumley thought not dangerous by nature pit himself in a potentially lethal situation by venturing out in the world in search of intellectual companionship. Thirdly, often the well being of any animal is decided by many alternate factors, along with the discretion...


Foreword by Roberta Ahmanson; introduction by John Silvis; essay by Jane Neal 64pp, hardback, 315 x 250 mm, c. 40 images In this publication, British artist Anna Freeman Bentley presents a series of new paintings and works on paper documenting her journey into the exclusive realm of private members clubs, and in particular to some of the most desirable clubs around Los Angeles. In places where photography is often strictly forbidden, Freeman Bentley had access to some of the many lounges, bars, and restaurants that are second homes to the members who pay considerable fees to use them. Freeman Bentley uses her photographs of these out-of-hours spaces as the starting point for unpeopled drawings, collages, and painted sketches, transforming her studies into complex paintings that hover between reality and invention. Read moreRead more
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Essay by Freya Cooper Kiddie 88pp, hardback, 255 x 195 mm, c. 45 images Coinciding with a solo presentation of ‘The Hoax Suite’ by British painter Justin Mortimer at the 2018 edition of The Armory Show in New York, this publication presents 30 paintings depicting dead and dying flowers, offering not only an intense exposition of still life, but perhaps also one of the most significant series of paintings of flowers in our time. Read moreRead more
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Foreword by Paulette Terry Brien, essay and in-conversation by Charlotte Keenan McDonald 78pp + 8pp covers, paperback, 245 x 171.5 mm, c. 35 images Louise Giovanelli (b.1993, London) is one of Britain’s most promising young painters. This, the artist’s first monograph, documents her first three solo exhibitions, staged in 2016-17 at The International 3, Salford, the Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool, and Touchstones Rochdale. Featuring a foreword by Paulette Terry Brien, co-founder and co-director of The International 3, Salford, UK, and an essay and an interview by Charlotte Keenan McDonald, Curator of British Art at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, this publication has been beautifully designed by Textbook Studio and published by Anomie in a first edition of 500 copies. Read moreRead more
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Introduction by Paul Moorhouse, essays by Jane Neal and James Cahill 104pp + 4pp covers, hardback in hard slipcase, 292 x 245 mm, c. 49 images 'Matters of Life and Death' is a limited-edition publication documenting the accomplished and haunting recent paintings of celebrated Dallas-based British artist Richard Patterson (b.1963). An engaging introduction by Paul Moorhouse, Senior Curator at the National Portrait Gallery, London, discusses the dynamic and complex relationship between figuration and abstraction in Patterson’s oeuvre. In his essay, art historian James Cahill explores the subjects of portraiture and personae within the artist’s works, while curator and critic Jane Neal navigates ideas of gender and sexuality in Patterson’s practice, taking us into the realms of fetish and the male gaze. Featuring a selection of works executed between 2013 and 2016, many of which are published here for the first time, the cloth-covered book is presented in a printed hard slipcase and published in an edition of just 500 copies. Read moreRead more
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Anomie Publishing's autumn/winter 16–17 brochure is now out, featuring recent, new and forthcoming titles along with information about our backlist publications. Highlights include a brand new edition of British electronic music pioneer Daphne Oram's 1972 book 'An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics', co-published with the Daphne Oram Trust, and a stunning clothbound hardback limited edition publication of the recent paintings of celebrated British artist Richard Patterson. Read moreRead more
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By Daphne Oram (first published in 1972), new introduction by Sarah Angliss 176pp + 4pp covers, hardback, 220 x 165 mm, c. 25 b/w images Daphne Oram (1925–2003) was one of the central figures in the development of British experimental electronic music. Having declined a place at the Royal College of Music to become a music balancer at the BBC, she went on to become the co-founder and first director of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. In 1972, she authored her only book, ‘An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics’. At a time when the world was just starting to engage with electronic music and the technology was still primarily in the hands of music studios, universities and corporations, her approach was both innovative and inspiring, encouraging anyone with an interest in music to think about the nature, capabilities and possibilities that the new sounds could bring. ‘An Individual Note’ is a playful yet compelling manifesto for the dawn of electronic music and for our individual capacity to use, experience and enjoy it. Read moreRead more
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Essay by Martin Herbert, interview with Sina Najafi 288pp + 4pp covers, hardback, 305 x 220 mm, c. 135 colour and b/w images This is the first major monograph on the British-born, New York-based artist Oliver Clegg. An eclectic, polyphonic and multidisciplinary artist, Clegg’s oeuvre stretches from painting, drawing and printmaking to sculpture, installation, site-specific art, participatory projects and beyond. Indeed, his practice is in many ways a shining example of ‘post-medium’ creativity today, pursuing the essence of art itself beyond any specific medium or artform. The irony is, he’s pretty damn good with each artform too. Read moreRead more
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Anomie Publishing's spring/summer 16 brochure is now out, featuring recent, new and forthcoming titles along with information about our backlist publications. Read moreRead more
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Foreword by Richard Parry, essay by Dr. Luke Skrebowski 64pp + 4pp covers, softback, 305 x 235 mm, c. 30 colour and b/w images Sensory Systems documents an engaging group exhibition presented at the Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool, in autumn 2015. The exhibition is the first in a new annual programme by the gallery each autumn that will revolve around the theme of light, and timed to coincide with the famous Blackpool Illuminations – a six-mile-long outdoor display of lights that has drawn many visitors to the town each year since it was first switched on in 1912. The selection of prominent figures working internationally today who feature in the exhibition and publication are: Angela Bulloch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Ann Veronica Janssens, Anthony McCall and Conrad Shawcross. Read moreRead more
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Texts by David Cholmondeley, Peter Murray, and Hiram C. Butler 102pp + 4pp covers, Hardback, 260 x 300 mm, c. 60 colour and b/w images James Turrell is widely acknowledged as one of the most important artists working today. From the mid 1960s onwards his principal concern has been the way we apprehend light and space. In summer/autumn 2015, Houghton Hall, Norfolk, hosted an ambitious and significant exhibition of James Turrell's light pieces, many collected by the Marquess of Cholmondeley, owner of Houghton, who has long been an admirer of his work. The publication has been produced to document the exhibition, and includes a foreword by David Cholmondeley, a text by Peter Murray, and interview with the artist by Hiram C. Butler. Designed by Peter B. Willberg and printed in Italy, this hardback, cloth-covered publication is essential reading for all admirers of Turrell’s oeuvre. Published by Houghton Hall in association with Anomie. Read moreRead more
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